Is RUSSIA about to release Hillary Clinton’s intercepted emails?

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(Clinton.news) For months likely Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has claimed that her unsecured private email server she used during her stint as President Obama’s Secretary of State was never hacked and in fact was safe despite the fact that it was outside the protection and security of federal email systems.

And while information technology and cybersecurity experts have refuted those claims and a well-known hacker named “Guccifer” has told federal authorities while in custody that he in fact hacked Clinton’s server, Russia may be set to prove once and for all that her server was both unsecure and hacked.

As reported by OilPrice.com, “reliable sources in the West” say warnings have been transmitted by the Russian government that it could, in the near future, release text of email messages that were intercepted rom Clinton’s server during her four-year tenure at State.

Such a release would prove conclusively that Clinton had indeed compromised U.S. secrets and made the susceptible to being stolen by foreign governments – emails that include several Top Secret and even more sensitive information – in violation of U.S. statutes governing the handling of such material.

As OilPrice.com reported further:

The reports indicated that the decision as to whether to reveal the intercepts would be made by Russian Federation President Vladimir Putin, and it was possible that the release would, if made, be through a third party, such as Wikileaks. The apparent message from Moscow, through the intelligence community, seemed to indicate frustration with the pace of the official U.S. Department of Justice investigation into the so-called server scandal, which seemed to offer prima facie evidence that U.S. law had been violated by Mrs. Clinton’s decision to use a private server through which to conduct official and often highly-secret communications during her time as Secretary of State.

U.S. intelligence sources indicated that the extensive probe led by the FBI and the Department of Justice has been largely focused on whether Clinton’s private server, which was located in her home in Chappaqua, N.Y., was used by her to defy U.S. open records laws and protect communications she wanted to keep secret. Some of those communications, say analysts, may have involved discussions with quid pro quo transactions – foreign governments essentially buying future access to a Clinton White House via donations to the Clinton Family Foundation, in exchange for favorable treatment via Clinton’s foreign policy.

Moscow’s possession of the intercepted emails, however, also aimed to demonstrate that, separate from violating U.S. law regarding the handling of sensitive material, the email exchanges included extremely sensitive materials that had their classification headers stripped out.

“Russian (and other) sources had indicated frustration with the pace of the Justice Dept. probe, and its avoidance of the national security aspects of intelligence handling,” OilPrice.com reported. “This meant that the topic would be suppressed by the U.S. Barack Obama Administration so that it would not be a factor in the current U.S. Presidential election campaign, in which President Obama had [sic] endorsed Mrs. Clinton.”

The back-channeling messaging of Moscow’s possible intent, coming amid a presidential contest that is already highly charged, was aimed at pressuring U.S. officials and investigators within Justice and the Obama administration to quicken the pace of the probe and to reach a conclusion. But it is also a result of anticipated anti-Russian policy should Hillary Clinton win the election and succeed Obama.

Russia aside, intelligence and cyber security professionals have said Clinton’s server was very likely targeted by a plethora of foreign government intelligence services even before anyone realized or knew that it was unsecured, simply because of her high-level position within the Obama administration. China, Russia, North Korea and Iran, among others, have been mentioned as possibly targeting the server.

Sources:

Wired.com

FoxNews.com

OilPrice.com